Royal Wedding : How will Meghan Markle wedding dress look like?

 

Now that we are less than a week away from the Royal Wedding, we are so excited to speculate  every bit of detail of the royal wedding dress. Will Meghan Markle be wearing something classic or whimsical?

Here, we look into some of the most remarkable wedding dresses in history, to discuss which dress features will most likely catch Meghan eyes.
 

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Neckline Feature:

One of the iconic classics is definitely Grace Kelly’s wedding gown in 1956, which was later emulated by many other brides, such as Kate Middleton and Miranda Kerr. Would Meghan be walking down the aisle in a high neckline gown as well? The high neckline is a dress feature that not only exudes a touch of royalty and sophistication, it also condes with the religious values in the nuptials. Thus, it's not hard to imagine why it remained so popular throughout the decades.

The Square neckline / boat neckline may also be one of Meghan’s top choices as we have seen it worn by Queen Margrethe of Denmark at her wedding in 1967. The square neckline is elegant and formal, with a touch of edginess. When Queen Margrethe paired the edgy neckline with fitted sleeves, her gown perfectly embodies the classic 60’s vibe.

However, we think that the illusion neckline might just be Meghan’s pick, as it is the most versatile neckline out of all. It allows the bride to keep up with the modern trend by showing off a little skin, which keeps the whole look elegant without being too sexy. It is also the best neckline in illustrating the designer’s acute choice of fabrics and lace styles.

 

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Silhouette Feature:

Voluminous meringue-like silhouettes such as the A line and Ball gown are popular choices among royal weddings. It would not be surprising if Meghan’s gown adopted these billowing silhouettes, since the royal wedding is held in the lavish setting of Windsor castle.

But would Meghan follow this long established trend, or break the mold with her own unique style? Long gone were the days of donning a voluminous silhouette just for that glamorous scene of walking down the aisle of a church or ballroom. Instead, brides now opt for a more contemporary wedding dress that is effortless, chic, and easy to walk in.

 

Simpler styles like the Court Silhouette is among the most popular contemporary dress silhouettes. For Princess Charlene’s wedding in Monaco in 2011, she wore an off-shoulder, court shape wedding dress in silk satin, with a cathedral train. The look is not only sophisticated, but it still preserves the glamorous royal wedding look that we have all known and come to love.


Another noteworthy silhouette on our list is the body hugging Mermaid Silhouette that has always been the rage on the red carpet. Model Kate Moss’ wedding dress also adopted the mermaid silhouette, faultlessly showing off her bodily curves clothed in light flowy fabric. While it is highly unlikely for the mermaid silhouette to appear on the aisles of royal weddings, we can’t help but dream. After all, Meghan’s adoration for slimming silhouettes could be seen in her daily wear from time to time.

photo credit : rockmywedding.uk

photo credit : rockmywedding.uk

Train Length

And down to the last detail - Just how long would the train of Meghan’s dress be?

The train length of the dress has always been dictated by the formality of the wedding. So the more formal the wedding, the longer the train is expected to be. However, most brides pick their train length solely on preference, and you can also choose not to have a train at all.

The Royal train trails a yard or more behind you and is the most formal choice. It requires a lot of attention from the bridesmaids, but we are sure that Meghan will have as much hands as she needs.

Chapel train is slightly shorter, extending about 30-46cm behind, and is one of the most popular trains amongst brides. It adds a touch of elegance to the look without adding too much weight.

Lastly, the Court train, also known as a brush train, has a length that brushes the ground and is usually about 15cm beyond the hem. For brides who want a train for their dresses, the court train is the easiest to wear and is most appropriate for most ceremonies.